Foot pain ruining your golf swing?

(Sarasota, FL – April 2020)

The barrier to a perfect golf swing could lie in your big toe. Or your heel. Or on the ball of your foot. Dr. James M. Cottom, DPM, FACFAS, a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS), says these are the three areas of your feet most likely to cause pain that can ruin your golf swing.

Behind these pain-prone spots can lie stiff joints, stretched-out tissues and even nerve damage. But pain relief is possible and frequently does not require surgery.

According to Dr. Cottom, the three most common painful foot conditions that can ruin your golf swing are heel pain, arthritis and pinched nerves.

Several other painful conditions can also cause instability during your swing. Some athletes and former athletes develop chronic ankle instability from previous ankle sprains that failed to heal properly. Motion-limiting arthritis and Achilles tendonitis can also affect your balance. Ill-fitting golf shoes may cause corns and calluses that make standing uncomfortable.

For the majority of golfers and other patients Dr. Cottom recommends simple treatments such as custom orthotic devices (shoe inserts), stretching exercises, changes to your shoes, medications, braces or steroid injections and physical therapy. However, if these conservative measures fail to provide adequate relief, surgery may be required.

“Foot pain is not normal. With the treatment options available to your foot and ankle surgeon, a pain-free golf swing is clearly in view,” says Cottom. “When your feet aren’t in top condition, your golf swing won’t be either.”

For more information on foot and ankle conditions, visit www.FLOFAC.com or call 941.924.8777 to reach Dr. Cottom.

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